The Microbiome In Your Body Thrives With Regular Physical Contact

The following excerpt is from an article that originally appeared on Natural Blaze

By Josh Richardson

Hugging helps the immune system, cures depression, reduces stress and induces sleep. Gut bacteria also appears to thrive with regular physical contact, suggests new data that shows ‘huddling’ actions lead to a synchronised microbiome.

Beneficial bacteria in the gut are known to attack pathogens, manufacture vitamins and even act as anti-cancer agents. Recent research has strengthened the scientific understanding that the microbes that live in your gut may affect what goes on in your body.

“”‘When people with different gut microbiomes interact, they share their symbiotic bacteria through touch,” said Aura Raulo, lead author and graduate student at Oxford University’s department of zoology.

“I might host a bacteria in my gut that is well-behaved, and fits my symbiotic gut community, but might turn out to be an invasive pathogen in another person who is not accustomed to it.”

The animal data, published in the Journal of Animal

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